Ear, Nose & Throat Conditions We Treat

Our pediatric specialists treat a wide range of ENT conditions, both common and rare. See a list of the conditions we treat​.

  • Condition

    22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    A genetic disorder caused by the partial deletion of genetic material on one copy of a person’s chromosome 22.

  • Condition

    Allergic Rhinitis

    An inflammation of the mucous membrane that lines the nose, often due to an allergy to pollen, dust or other airborne substances.

  • Condition

    Branchial Cleft Abnormality

    An irregularity that occurs during fetal development that results in malformations in the side of the neck, appearing anywhere from the ear, along the line of the jaw, to the throat.

  • Condition

    Cholesteatoma

    Cholesteatoma (pronounced co-les-tee-ah-tow-mah) is a benign growth that must be removed because it damages the ear and may cause serious complications. Learn more.

  • Condition

    Congenital Muscular Torticollis

    Learn tips to prevent congenital muscular torticollis (wryneck, fibromatosis colli/pseudotumor of infancy), a condition causing an infant's neck to twist.

  • Condition

    Croup

    Croup is a viral infection most common in children that causes swelling of the upper airway and respiratory issues including a barking cough.

  • Condition

    Dermoid Cysts

    A dermoid cyst is a benign growth made up of hairs, sweat glands and sebaceous glands. Learn more about the symptoms and treatment of pediatric dermoid cysts.

  • Condition

    Deviated Septum

    Deviated septum is an abnormal shape of the cartilage that divides the nose, and may cause congestion, problems with breathing, or nasal discharge. Learn more.

  • Condition

    Dysphagia

    The inability of food or liquids to pass easily from the mouth, into the throat and down into the esophagus to the stomach during the process of swallowing.

  • Condition

    Ear Deformities

    Currently, up to 30% of births result in ear deformities. Of this number, 70% of the deformities stay the same or get worse as the baby grows.

  • Condition

    Earwax Buildup (Cerumen Impaction)

    Earwax buildup can block the ear canal and lead to ringing in the ear, itching, hearing loss, pain, discharge, odor and cough.

  • Condition

    Feeding & Swallowing Problems

    Both behavioral and physiological issues can affect childhood eating, resulting in either the refusal or inability to eat foods normally.

  • Condition

    Foreign Bodies in the Ear

    Anything that enters the ear that doesn’t belong there. Typically food, toy parts, small household items, or items from nature. Most can be removed by a physician in the office.

  • Condition

    Foreign Bodies in the Nose and Airway

    Anything that enters the body that doesn’t belong there. Typically food, toy parts, small household items, or items from nature. Most can be removed by a physician in the office.

  • Condition

    Laryngeal Cleft

    A laryngeal cleft is a gap in the tissues at the back of the voice box, which sometimes extends further down into the tissues that separate the windpipe and esophagus.

  • Condition

    Laryngeal Web

    Children can be born with a laryngeal web, or it can be acquired as a scar between the vocal cords where they meet.

  • Condition

    Laryngomalacia

    Laryngomalacia is a malformation of the top of the voice box at birth, which causes floppiness of the upper airway above the vocal cords.

  • Condition

    Lip Tie

    Lip tie occurs when a piece of tissue (a frenulum) behind the upper lip is short and tight. Learn more.

  • Condition

    Mastoiditis

    A bacterial infection within the mastoid, a bone that contains a series of air spaces that connect to the middle ear space.

  • Condition

    Microtia & Aural Atresia

    A small, abnormally shaped ear, ranging from a minimally deformed small ear to a complete absence of the ear, and the absence of the ear canal; commonly found together.

  • Condition

    Nasal Fracture (Broken Nose)

    Possible signs of nasal fracture (broken nose) include bruising of the nose and under the eyes, nosebleeds after injury, swelling of the nose or a crooked appearance of the nose. Learn more.

  • Condition

    Neck Abscess

    A mass of pus (yellowish-white fluid filled with dead white blood cells) from an infection that collects in spaces between the structures of the neck.

  • Condition

    Nosebleed

    Bleeding from the nose; a common occurrence in young children.

  • Condition

    Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA)

    Intervals of no airflow through the nose and mouth during sleep despite continued attempts to breathe in and out.

  • Condition

    Otitis Media (Ear Infection)

    Inflammation of the middle ear, often occurring with a viral upper respiratory tract illness, and is one of the most common diagnoses for U.S. children.

  • Condition

    Otorrhea (Ear Drainage)

    Otorrhea, or drainage from the ear, can occur after a ruptured ear drum from an acute ear infection, if the ear(s) become infected after tympanostomy tube (ear tube) placement, and from external ear infections.

  • Condition

    Pharyngitis & Tonsillitis

    An infection of the pharynx and/or tonsils, very common in children, and usually caused by the Streptococcus virus, thus commonly referred to as “strep throat.”

  • Condition

    Sinusitis

    An infection of the sinuses near the nose, usually occurring after a cold or after an allergic inflammation.

  • Condition

    Stridor

    Stridor is the term for noisy breathing that comes from the upper airway (trachea and voice box) and can be heard without a stethoscope

  • Condition

    Subglottic Stenosis (SGS)

    Subglottic stenosis is a narrowing of the lowest part of the voice box, below the vocal cords.

  • Condition

    Swimmer's Ear

    Also called otitis externa, a commonly occurring infection of the part of the ear canal between the outside of the ear and the eardrum.

  • Condition

    Thyroglossal Duct Cysts

    A lump or mass that forms in the center of the front of the neck and is the result of malformation in pregnancy.

  • Condition

    Thyroid Cancer

    Pediatric thyroid cancer is an uncommon cancer in children that causes thyroid gland cells to grow and multiply too much, forming a nodule in the lower neck.

  • Condition

    Tongue-Tie (Ankyloglossia)

    Ankyloglossia, or tongue-tie, is a congenital condition in which the tongue is restricted in movement due to tissue (called a frenulum) tethering it to the mouth floor. Tongue-tie may contribute to infant feeding problems and, as a child ages, may affect speaking and oral hygiene. In many cases, these issues resolve once the condition is treated....

  • Condition

    Tracheal Rings

    Complete tracheal rings refers to a defect in the structure of the cartilages that make up the trachea.

  • Condition

    Tracheoesophageal Fistula

    A congenital condition in which an abnormal connection exists between the windpipe and the tube that carries food and water from the mouth to the stomach.

  • Condition

    Tracheomalacia

    Normal tracheal cartilages are round, and because of this shape, they can withstand positive pressure forces without collapsing.

  • Condition

    Velopharyngeal Dysfunction (VPD)

    Velopharyngeal dysfunction, or VPD, is a condition resulting from inadequate closure of the velopharyngeal port, or the opening between the nose and the mouth, during speech. Learn more.

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