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Team Roles

Who's Who in the Lurie Children's NICU

This is a special type of pediatrician (children’s doctor) who has special medical training in the care of sick newborn babies. This doctor is supervising your baby’s medical care and team.

This is a fully trained pediatrician who is receiving additional special medical training in the care of sick newborn babies. A fellow may be a part of your baby’s medical team under the supervision of the Neonatologist.

A doctor who is receiving medical training in baby and child health. A resident may be a part of your baby’s medical team under the supervision of the Neonatologist.

A fully trained pediatrician who only works in the hospital (as opposed to a pediatrician that will see patients in clinics outside of the hospital). A hospitalist may be a part of your baby’s medical team under the supervision of the Neonatologist.

A Neonatal Nurse Practitioner (NNP)/Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN) is a nurse with an advanced nursing degree that includes special nursing and medical training in caring for sick newborn babies. This type of nurse works with your baby’s medical team and can perform procedures, prescribe medicines and care for your baby. A nurse practitioner may be a part of your baby’s medical team under the supervision of the Neonatologist.

A health care provider who has a nursing degree. In the NICU, a registered nurse will have special training in caring for sick newborn babies.

A nurse who makes sure the NICU runs well. The charge nurse is responsible for staffing in the NICU and coordinating the admission or discharge of babies, as well as checks in with families during their stay.

A health care provider trained to care for babies with breathing problems. They have special training in the medical equipment needed to help your baby’s breathing.

A health care provider with special training in how medicines work and their side effects. The pharmacist joins the medical team daily to ensure all of your baby’s medicines are the right amount and if there are any side effects to expect.

A health care provider who is trained as an expert in nutrition. The RD joins the medical team daily during rounds to make sure your baby is getting all the nutrients he/she needs.

A health care provider who is trained to help people with speech and language problems. In the NICU, the speech therapist helps newborns with feeding problems.

A health care provider who helps figure out how well the baby moves. They look at any problems the baby has moving and how that may affect things like sitting, rolling or walking. A PT may start evaluating and providing treatment to your baby while in the NICU and may recommend continued treatment after going home.

A health care provider who has special training in evaluating and helping your baby’s overall development. An OT may evaluate your baby while in the NICU and may recommend further treatment when your baby goes home.

A person who is trained to use the therapeutic qualities of music with even the most fragile children to reduce a child’s perception of pain and anxiety as well as offer an outlet for families for feelings about illness and hospitalization.

Bedside nurses with special training to help women breastfeed, educate on maintaining milk supply and use of breast pumps.

A person who is trained to help families cope with their baby’s NICU stay. The social worker assists families in many different ways during their NICU stay. They may help organize family meetings with your baby’s medical providers, provide emotional support, complete postpartum depression screens, help navigate insurance and help plan for when your baby goes home.

A person who provides spiritual support to families.

A NICU staff member who assists the medical team if your baby needs special equipment for going home. They will help coordinate with the medical device company, your insurance, and the medical team.

A dedicated NICU person who works directly with the family of select medically complex infants during their hospital stay and even after discharge. The Care Coordinator acts as a central point of contact for family and assists them in learning to navigate child’s complex care in hospital and at home with multiple medical teams.