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Association of obstructive sleep apnea and total sleep time with health-related quality of life in children undergoing a routine polysomnography: a PROMIS approach

Xu S, Turakhia S, Miller M, Johnston D, Maddalozzo J, Thompson D, Trosman I, Grandner M, Sheldon SH, Ahluwalia V, Bhushan B

J Clin Sleep Med. 2022 Mar 1; 18(3):801-808

Abstract

Study objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) negatively impacts health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) in adults, but few pediatric studies have explored this relationship or the relationships between HR-QoL domains.

Methods: Patients aged 8-17 years visiting the sleep laboratory from July 2019 to January 2020 for overnight polysomnography participated in the study. Controls seen for problems other than sleep disturbance were recruited from Department of Pediatrics outpatient clinics. HR-QoL was assessed by Patient-Reported Outcome Measure Information System (PROMIS) profile questionnaires, version 2.0. Statistical analysis was conducted using R 3.6.0 (R Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, Austria).

Results: One hundred twenty-two patients were included in the final analysis. Sixty-four patients were males (52.4%). Twenty-nine (23.8%) had mild OSA, 8 (6.6%) had moderate OSA, 17 (13.9%) had severe OSA, 46 (37.7%) were without OSA, and 22 (18.0%) were controls. Patients referred for polysomnography had lower physical function mobility compared with controls (P = .03). Increased OSA severity was linearly associated with a decrease in physical function mobility (P = .008). Correlation analysis revealed that physical function mobility was positively associated with total sleep time (P = .02) and negatively associated with apnea-hypopnea index (P = .01). Age was positively associated with fatigue (P = .02) and negatively associated with deep sleep (P < .001). Regression analysis revealed that physical function mobility was positively associated with total sleep time (P = .02) and negatively associated with apnea-hypopnea index (P = .04) after controlling for age, sex, and number of arousals.

Conclusions: OSA and total sleep time were associated with problems with physical function mobility after adjusting for age, sex, and number of arousals.

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