2023 Different Approaches to Data (DAD) Pilot Project Update

The purpose of the Family and Child Health Innovations Program (FCHIP) Different Approaches to Data (DAD) Pilot funding is to encourage researchers to expand their work beyond a maternal-child or dyadic focus and to begin to collect pilot data that allows for a more holistic and contemporary view of families. These Pilot funds can be used to expand research to include fathers (or partners) in creative ways. For the third round of DAD Pilot funding, FCHIP is pleased to announce the winners for 2023: John James Parker, MD, MS, and Soyang Kwon, PhD.

John James Parker, MD, MS

Title: CAN DO Dads: A novel longitudinal survey of fathers and other caregivers  

Problem
There is growing literature that links the health of fathers and paternal involvement with child health outcomes. Additionally, the transition to fatherhood is a key moment in the life course of men and is associated with positive and negative changes to men’s health.1 However, there are few longitudinal studies evaluating fathers’ health and paternal involvement in childcare that begin in the postpartum period.  
 
Approach 
This study, called CAN DO Dads, is an ancillary study to the Childhood Activities Nutrition Development Oversight (CAN DO) Study. CAN DO Dads will recruit a second caregiver and will administer 4 surveys over the first 3 years of their child’s life. The survey addresses the father’s health service utilization, their personal health, and their involvement in childcare.    
 
Significance
The CAN DO Dads survey will provide novel longitudinal data source of fathers that will allow researchers to study the growing influence of men’s health and paternal caregiving on the health of fathers and their families. 

Soyang Kwon, PhD

Title: Father-mother differences in parenting practices and perceptions of their child’s development and behavioral difficulties

Problem
Father-mother concordance on parenting practices and perceptions of their child’s development and behavioral difficulties are important to better support child development and wellbeing. However, early childhood development and parenting research often includes maternal-child dyads and miss an important opportunity to include fathers to understand more holistic dynamics of families related to early childhood development and health.  

Approach
This pilot study will collect primary data from the fathers of the Child and Mother Physical Activity Study (CAMPAS) participants. Father-reported data from the pilot study and mother-reported data from CAMPAS on parenting practices, parenting stress, and their young child’s development and behavioral difficulties will be compared.  

Significance 
This pilot study will provide preliminary data to understand the impacts of fathers’ perspective and involvement on early childhood development and wellbeing.