Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship

The child and adolescent psychiatry fellowship (residency) program is based primarily at Lurie Children's, a tertiary care hospital with more than 1,100 pediatric specialists in more than 70 specialties. The hospital has also served as the pediatric training ground for Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine for more than 60 years. The attending physicians in the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry are an integral part of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Northwestern University.

In June 2012, our state-of-the-art facility opened on the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine campus, and became Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago. Our location offers even greater opportunities for academic and research collaboration. 

The child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP) program's biopsychosocial model provides a flexible curriculum in diverse clinical settings. It also offers an opportunity for interdisciplinary learning in neurology, pediatrics, psychology, social work and speech pathology. Fellows master the basic skills of child and adolescent psychiatry and develop special interests according to their career goals. Opportunities are available for supervised research.

Our hospital offers mental health services for children, adolescents, and their families of all socioeconomic and ethnic backgrounds. Patients are seen for the full range of diagnostic categories, including:

  • Attachment disorders
  • Behavior disorders
  • Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder
  • Learning disabilities
  • Intellectual disabilities
  • Mood disorders
  • Anxiety syndromes
  • Somatoform disorders
  • Autism
  • Psychoses
  • Organic brain dysfunction
  • Other psychiatric disorders

Outpatient treatment can include individual psychotherapy, group therapy, family therapy, pharmacotherapy, and combined treatments; in 2011, there were over 22,000 outpatient visits in the department. CAP fellows also gain experience at Northwestern Memorial Hospital working with adolescents with substance use disorders and a variety of psychiatric illnesses. CAP fellows take calls from home an average of once every nine nights to provide emergency psychiatric evaluation and consultation services at Lurie Children’s.

Faculty and staff in psychology, nursing, social work, special education, recreation therapy, and speech and language pathology contribute to a multidisciplinary learning experience. Child and adolescent psychiatrists from the community also conduct clinical supervision and teach seminars. They offer a variety of perspectives and have expertise in areas such as law and psychiatry, cultural diversity, and psychoanalytic theory. Attorneys from the Juvenile Division of the Cook County Office of the Public Guardian host the fellows for an experience in the juvenile court system. 

Interdisciplinary Learning

This program provides the opportunity for interdisciplinary learning with predoctoral and postdoctoral students from psychology, social work, education, speech pathology, neurology, and pediatrics. General psychiatry residents from the Feinberg School of Medicine have a rotation at Lurie Children’s, and medical students from the medical school have a monthly didactic session in the department. In addition, the department offers a selective third-year medical student clerkship rotation, as well as senior medical student electives that attract students from Chicago and around the country. The department's clinical child psychology internship is one of the oldest and most competitive in the country.

Our diverse group of fellows come from locally and nationally recognized general psychiatry programs, and many have been honored for leadership and scholarship in their previous programs. Their individual academic interests have encompassed the broad range of diagnostic, treatment, and community areas of CAP work, providing a rich environment for peer learning and support. We are committed to providing state-of-the-art training for future child and adolescent psychiatrists, incorporating evidence-based practices when appropriate.